For Brave Macbeth Quote Analysis Essay

Essay Macbeth Character Analysis

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Character Analysis

     In the tragedy Macbeth, written by William Shakespeare, many character traits are portrayed through the various characters throughout the play. Macbeth was one of Shakespeare’s greatest tragedies. It was completed in 1606 and was most likely first performed before King James I and his royal family at Hampton Court. King James I is believed to be a direct descendent of the character Banquo. Probably the most potent character trait expressed in Macbeth would be integrity or the lack there of. Integrity could be defined as doing the right thing at all costs no matter what the consequences or what would be in the persons best interest. In this play the person that displays the most…show more content…

     The first event that showed Macbeth giving up on his integrity would be when he and his wife plotted to murder Duncan when he stayed at their castle for the night. In the time that this play took place there was almost no greater sin than to consider killing the King, but not only did Macbeth consider it he actually carried it out. The only thing keeping Macbeth from being the king of Scotland is the fact that that title belongs to Duncan. So in order for Macbeth to attain this highest honor he must dispose of King Duncan and not be caught. But with this murder comes many more acts of lack of integrity on Macbeth’s behalf.
     In another scene in the play Macbeth is forced to kill one of his long time friends Banquo. Instead of doing it himself Macbeth hires murderers to kill Banquo for him showing once again that he is turning more and more against his values, because this shows in a way that he may be somewhat scared. Another thing that shows that Macbeth is scared is that he is trying everything possible to hide his treachery and even says, “False face must hide what the false heart doth know.'; (1,7,82) In this line Macbeth tells us that he must lie on the outside to keep the secrets he has inside from getting to other people.
     Through out the

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At the beginning of the play, Macbeth's courageous exploits on the battlefield are celebrated by King Duncan and the Scottish nobles. In act 1, scene 2, the Captain recalls Macbeth's heroic performance in battle against Macdonwald's forces by telling King Duncan,

But all’s too weak, For brave Macbeth—well he deserves that name—Disdaining fortune, with his brandished steel, Which smoked with bloody execution, Like valor’s minion carved out his passage Till he faced the slave; Which...

At the beginning of the play, Macbeth's courageous exploits on the battlefield are celebrated by King Duncan and the Scottish nobles. In act 1, scene 2, the Captain recalls Macbeth's heroic performance in battle against Macdonwald's forces by telling King Duncan,

But all’s too weak, For brave Macbeth—well he deserves that name—Disdaining fortune, with his brandished steel, Which smoked with bloody execution, Like valor’s minion carved out his passage Till he faced the slave; Which ne'er shook hands, nor bade farewell to him, Till he unseamed him from the nave to th' chops, And fixed his head upon our battlements (Shakespeare, 1.2.15-24).

The Captain proceeds to tell King Duncan how Macbeth and Banquo valiantly fought against Norwegian forces after defeating Macdonwald's soldiers. He likens Macbeth to a lion and says,

If I say sooth, I must report they were As cannons overcharged with double cracks, So they doubly redoubled strokes upon the foe. Except they meant to bathe in reeking wounds, Or memorize another Golgotha (Shakespeare, 1.2.63-41).

When Ross finds Macbeth to deliver the news that he has been given the title Thane of Cawdor, Ross begins by describing King Duncan's reaction to the accounts of Macbeth's fearless performance on the battlefield. Ross's account of the king's reaction once again emphasizes Macbeth's heroics. Ross tells Macbeth the following:

The king hath happily received, Macbeth, The news of thy success, and when he reads Thy personal venture in the rebels' fight, His wonders and his praises do contend Which should be thine or his. Silenced with that, In viewing o'er the rest o' the selfsame day, He finds thee in the stout Norweyan ranks, Nothing afeard of what thyself didst make, Strange images of death. As thick as tale Can post with post, and every one did bear Thy praises in his kingdom’s great defense, And poured them down before him (Shakespeare, 1.3.90-101).

As the play progresses, Macbeth falls victim to his own ambition and turns into a ruthless, malevolent tyrant.

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